If you’re a parent, you’ve probably been there a few times: standing in the middle of a grocery store, at a public park or at a friend’s house while your child screams, cries and refuses to get up off the ground. Most parents are fully aware of what a temper tantrum looks like. What many do not know, is how to prevent them from happening.

Here are eight parenting habits that stop temper tantrums in children:

1. Make Sure Your Child Sleeps In Their Own Beds

Letting your child sleep in your bed can become a long-term bad habit. In order to teach your child about boundaries and help them become independent, you must have them sleep in their own bed. This can help cut down on temper tantrums when the two of you are separated for a short time.

2. Give Your Child Freedom

As a parent, your instinct is to immediately step in and take care of or defend your child. But giving them more freedom to handle a situation on their own can help foster independence and let your child know that they are strong, smart and capable.

3. Don’t Make Special “Kids” Food

Assuming that your child won’t like a certain food will only hurt them in the long run. Have them try everything! Instead of making special food for your kids at every meal, have them eat the same thing the adults are eating. This will help cut down on temper tantrums at mealtimes.

4. Teach Your Child Manners

A child who understands how important it is to have good manners is a lot less likely to throw a tantrum in a public place. Teach your child to say “please” and “thank you” and to always be on their best behavior in front of others. Make sure they know exactly what you expect from them.

5. Make Sunday Family Day

Choose one day a week for “family day.” Get the family together and have a barbecue, go for a bike ride or have a picnic in the park. Children often throw tantrums for attention, so make sure at least one day a week is all about family time.

6. Don’t Have Grandparents Babysit

It’s great to get the grandkids and grandparents together, but make sure it’s for a family gathering instead of a free night of babysitting. Grandparents often play a supporting role in raising grandchildren, but don’t blur the lines by asking them to babysit.

7. Give Your Child An Allowance

Teach your child about the value of money by giving them an allowance each week. Children often throw temper tantrums in stores because they want you to buy them something. The next time your child wants a special item, let them know they can use their allowance to buy it.

8. Educate Your Child At Home

Your child will head off to school soon enough, so take advantage of the short time you have at home together. Read books, take walks, put puzzles together and swing as high as you can at the playground. Teaching them to dream and explore is just as important as teaching them math and science.

Sources:
Bright Side
Family Doctor
Parents